Art of Our Ancestors Exhibit opens at the West Caldwell Library on Monday July 1st

Still Life Basket - Artist Lilly Baldwin Feather Wreath - Artist UnknownPlease join the Historical Society of West Caldwell on Monday evening from 6-8pm at the West Caldwell library, as they present an exhibit that is devoted entirely to art and craft work created by people living in the West Essex region and dates as far back as the 1800’s. The exhibit, titled “Art of our Ancestors”, features work from both local professional artists, housewives, teachers, draftsmen, and even some unknowns. If your family was originally from the West Essex area, you might be related to one of these local artists or you may have picked up a painting from area may have been created by one of them!
The meeting room at the library will feature additional works of art on Monday only that will not be hanging on the exhibit wall in the library through the month of July. Members of the Historical Society of West Caldwell will be on hand to share the research and artists biographies as well as to answer any questions. Light refreshments will be served and everyone is welcome to a souvenir bookmark from this very special exhibit!
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Lion Needlepainting

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Lion Needlepainting

Needlepainting – the art of “painting” with a needle and thread – is one of the most complex forms of hand embroidery. Most of these pieces were done from the turn of the 20th century and into the 1920s. This popular pastime became fashionable for all women, not just those in high society, as the name implies. However, the silk threads and flosses were more expensive and, therefore, used more often by women of more means. Work by Libby Gould, date unknown.

Editing the artwork for the exhibit

Piles of artwork for exhibit

artwork

drawing

local scenery

It was a beautiful warm spring day at the historical Zenas Crane House in West Caldwell. The light was wonderful coming in from the windows and the old wood floor shined with a beautiful patina as the sun played across the patterns of the wood. Four determined ladies from The Historical Society of West Caldwell had small piles of artwork everywhere. They carefully handled each piece of artwork with reverence as they laid the piles out and considered each for the upcoming exhibit. They edited by artist and by category. Making small talk as they went, they wondered if the bridge was from a certain town or if a house in an old painting was still in existence.